TJ Steadman on the rise and fall and rise of Nimrod aka Enmerkar, Giant, Nephil, Repha, Assyrian, Rahab, Leviathan, 1 of 5

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You can find all of my articles regarding TJ Steadman here.

When it comes to Nirmod, TJ Steadman commits the same error as most, if not all, of the people I featured in my book Nephilim and Giants as per Pop-Researchers and that is to claim that since Nephilim are referred to as gibborim in pre-flood days (the only days in which they existed) and Nimrod is described as having become a gibbor post-flood then he, somehow, became a Nephil.


You can find all of my articles regarding TJ Steadman here.

When it comes to Nirmod, TJ Steadman commits the same error as most, if not all, of the people I featured in my book Nephilim and Giants as per Pop-Researchers and that is to claim that since Nephilim are referred to as gibborim in pre-flood days (the only days in which they existed) and Nimrod is described as having become a gibbor post-flood then he, somehow, became a Nephil.

As noted in my article “TJ Steadman claims ‘gibbowr can have other meanings besides ‘giant,’” he claims that gibbor can mean giant—with what he means by giant being a different issue (he means many things by it and leaves it to his readers to guess what he means at any given time).

Referring to a stone monster, as per Hurrian/Hittite mythology, TJ Steadman writes, “Ullikummi is referred to as a giant. Nimrod is called a ‘mighty one’ or ‘gibbowr,’ a term previously used in Scripture only to describe giants” pause: Note that when it comes to Ullikummi he is using giants to mean something vague about unusual height but when it comes to Scripture he means Nephilim (and since we have no reliable physical description of them, we cannot rightly claim they were even one inch taller than average).
As a side note: I am taking “a term previously used in Scripture only to describe giants” to refer back to Gen 6:4 since he knows very well that gibbor is used to describe non-giants (again, whatever that means) such as Boaz, David, his soldiers, Angels, God, etc.

Thus, at this point, the correlation between Ullikummi the giant and Nimrod the mighty one/gibbowr is well, no correlation at all.

TJ Steadman goes on to write, “Ullikummi is so tall; he reaches from the depths of the underworld right up to heaven. Nimrod wasn’t that big, but something else was…Nimrod’s tower of Babel! The connection is obvious. Where the Hittite giant is made of stone, Babel is made of another impervious material – bricks. The poetic nature of the text allows the writer to combine these ideas seamlessly.”

I would agree that “Nimrod wasn’t that big” for two reasons: there is no reason to imagine he was taller than average and we have no physical description of him (so “imagine” is all that anyone could do when it comes to his height).
Then again, we have no measurement of the Tower of Babel either, not any reason to think that its foundations were from the depths of the underworld.

When it comes to Nimrod, TJ Steadman makes another claim that is like unto claims made by many people I featured in my book Nephilim and Giants as per Pop-Researchers and that is to claim that Nimrod was aka many names/terms/titles and some go onto concoct elaborate eschatological scenarios therefrom—such as that Nimrod will be the “anti-Christ,” etc.

For example, TJ Steadman writes the following about Ezekiel 31:3-9 (see my article The Apocalypse of the Hidden Hand), “The passage was intended by Ezekiel to compare the proud Egyptian Pharaoh and his people the Egyptians to ‘The Assyrian’ or Nimrod and his people, the Assyrians” so that Nimrod is aka The Assyrian—there is much more to come on this point.

He adds that “What the prophecy also does is explain to us more about the source of Nimrod’s power” and that “This passage may reaffirm Nimrod’s giant physical stature with the metaphor of a cedar tree, but more likely it is a reference to his dominion as a king.”
So, the height of a cedar is Nimrod’s height “but more likely it is a reference to his dominion as a king.” Now, of course, if this “may reaffirm” Nimrod’s “giant physical stature” that means it has already been affirmed but, pray tell, where?
First, however, he is quite right about the metaphor and goes on to note that “In
Biblical and other literature, kings are often likened to trees; specifically…‘cedars of Lebanon’ and the ‘oaks of Bashan,’” etc.
Such is the case, for example, in Amos 2:9 wherein the Amorites are referred to as being strong as oaks. Now, who even imagines that this implies conducting a one-to-one ratio based mathematical calculation between a person’s strength and that of an oak? Hopefully, no one: it is a mere metaphor for that they were strong.
Now, it also states that their “height was like the height of the cedars” and yes, in my aforementioned book I get into how many “giant” obsessed people do actually claim this was literal so they will measure cedars and tell us that is how tall Amorites were yet, these are mere metaphors for that they were big and strong.

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My well gone through copy of Steadman’s book

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