More Americans say “to believe in God” is not necessary “to be moral”—more, but not enough

Ten commandments, decalogue, atheism, true freethinker,..jpg

Regarding Gregory A. Smith’s “A growing share of Americans say it’s not necessary to believe in God to be moral,” Pew Research, October 16, 2017 AD.

How many times must we go through the same thing?!?!?!

1) Just to make it clear, that which “A growing share of Americans say” is a metric of just that, what “A growing share of Americans say” and not necessarily anything else.


Regarding Gregory A. Smith’s “A growing share of Americans say it’s not necessary to believe in God to be moral,” Pew Research, October 16, 2017 AD.

How many times must we go through the same thing?!?!?!

1) Just to make it clear, that which “A growing share of Americans say” is a metric of just that, what “A growing share of Americans say” and not necessarily anything else.

2) If Americans, or anyone else were taking a Biblical view on this, then 100% should say that “it’s not necessary to believe in God to be moral.”

3) The term “moral” must be defined and when it is defined without regard to God then, sure, anyone can be “moral” since that subjectively means whatever one wants it to mean—and it always end up meaning something in which the subjective definer includes themselves. Likewise with the article’s statement “Most U.S. adults now say it is not necessary to believe in God to be moral and have good values” we must now define “good” and we are in the same situation as regards “morals.”

Ten commandments, decalogue, atheism, true freethinker,..jpg

But it is even more complex that this since, technically speaking:
“Moral” refers to the “mores” which are mere descriptions of whatever people happen to be doing—thus, “morality” is, by definition, subjective, intrinsic, tentative, relative, situational, etc.
However, “ethic” refers to the “ethos” which are prescriptions of that which people ought to be going—thus, “ethics” are, by definition, objective, extrinsic, absolute, etc. Be aware that some employ this definition to the terms “absolute morals” or “universal morals” so that it is not so much about the term which is used but about the meaning of the terms.

And so, on this technical view to say that “it’s not necessary to believe in God to be moral” means “it’s not necessary to believe in God to do whatever one wants.”

Yet, even on the most fundamentalist Bible thumbing literal view no, “it’s not necessary to believe in God to be moral” or ethical, or hold to absolute morals or universal morals or however one wants to term it. How so and why not? Note the qualifying terms as that which is in question is whether it is “necessary” and here is the key “to believe in God.”
Since all humans are created in God’s image and He has placed His laws within us then one can “be moral” and people are “moral” even if they claim to not actually believe in God. By the very fact of our ontology, our nature, we can be “moral”—even though we may eventually sear our conscience to the point of rebelling against it, disregarding it, etc.

Thus, when the study concludes that this view even applies to “those who do identify with a religion, including white evangelical Protestants…religiously affiliated adults…The trends in opinion on this question also point in the same direction among white mainline Protestants, black Protestants and white Catholics” the study needs to go much deeper than it does.

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